Jul
15
2013
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments

Sometimes keeping up with the world is like drinking from a firehose: a bit overwhelming and not very pleasant. We try to use the latest tools to give you a variety of ways to get information from NEHM.

Here are our 5 favorite ways to follow NEHM:

5. Facebook: If you are on Facebook, have you 'liked' our page yet? Do it now! Note: No personal account is required to view our page, so visit now!

 

4. Twitter: We do not always post the same information to Facebook and Twitter. Why not follow both? Note: No personal account is required to view our page, so visit now!

3. Newsletters/Prayer Cycle: Sign up for our newsletter and weekly prayer cycle using the box at the bottom of this page. Already signed up? Enter your email address in the sign-up box and be sure your mailing address, etc. is up to date!

2. Blog: This is where you can read more than a snippet of information. On our blog, we profile program ideas, explain new resources, highlight upcoming events, and share news from our partners. Visit often to read what's new!

1. Prismatic: Ok, this one is brand new and (we think) very exciting. So what is Prismatic and why are we using it? Prismatic is a newsreader service. Basically, it posts articles from around the web. Go to our profile page there and you will be able to see what we have been reading lately. We will post links to health information, inspirational reading, Episcopal Chuch news, and more. Some of it is fun, some of it is important; it's all been handpicked by us to share with you. Note: No personal account is required to view our page, so visit now!

Jul
09
2013
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments

In Indianapolis, we have had a relatively cool summer so far. Other parts of the country have been experiencing record heat for quite a while now. Many will take a quick dip in a pool, lake or ocean to cool off. Usually, drowning doesn't look like drowning. Do you know what drowning really looks like?

From The Art of Manliness:

 

Drowning signs aren't like the movies: wivb.com

Jul
08
2013
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/resources-for-affordable-care-act">Resources for Affordable Care Act</a></h1>

Last week, I attended the webinar tour of the newly relaunched Healthcare.gov. Much like our recently cosponsored We Can! webinar, this was an interesting and informative presentation. In fact, these webinars have worked so well, NEHM is developing its own series of webinars based on this model. Stay tuned!

As a result of the webinar, we have added new resources, tagged 'Affordable Care Act'. These are official sources that will be maintained with the latest news and resources. We know this aspect of health care can be overwhelming for patients, caregivers, and those in health ministry. We believe these resources are the best starting place for you to get information. 

We have installed two widgets in these resources as well (see them below also). One will take you straight to healthcare.gov, while the other allows you to enter your zip code and find a federally-funded health center in your area. The Official Resources section in the CMS Health Insurance Marketplace provides access to logos, presentations, publications, and more. 

We hope you find these resources useful. In the meantime, don't forget to sign up for the additional webinars coming up:

The Health Care Law - Health Insurance Marketplace 101

July 11 at 2:00 p.m. ET

A presentation on the main provisions in the health care law (the Affordable Care Act) and how to access care in your community. Topics include the Health Insurance Marketplace, how to enroll in health insurance and how to receive updates on implementation of the law. A brief question and answer session will provide answers to commonly asked questions.

The Health Care Law - Health Insurance Marketplace 101

August 7 at 3:00 p.m. ET

A presentation on the main provisions in the health care law (the Affordable Care Act) and how to access care in your community. Topics include the Health Insurance Marketplace, how to enroll in health insurance and how to receive updates on implementation of the law. A brief question and answer session will provide answers to commonly asked questions.

Learn about the Health Insurance Marketplace & your new coverage options.

Jun
28
2013
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/carrot-and-stick">The Carrot and the (Walking) Stick</a></h1>

The Stick

We have already told you that sitting is killing you. Not only that, it's making us "fat and achy." Fortunately, the solution is easy:

  1. Remember to stand once an hour.
  2. Get about 30 minutes of activity per day.

Of course, even this is often easier said than done. I know personally, I can go for quite a long period at work without remembering to move around a little. Before long, two hours or more have passed by while I have barely moved a muscle.

Fortunately, the physical act of standing is not a barrier for me. I also have plenty of time (theoretically) to get in 30 minutes of activity a day. So why don't I? Paraphrasing Newton's First Law of Motion, 

"An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion..."

That is certainly true in my case. While at work, I tend to stay seated at my desk. Unfortunately, there is little cause for me to take a walk down the hall to discuss something with the staff of our friends at St. Paul's. Basically, unless I'm traveling I could spend all day seated at my desk with little cause to move. This is not good. 

I also love to watch sports. And movies. And television series. You can see where this is going; I spend way too much time in front of a screen of some sort throughout my day. The We Can! program encourages us to help our children eat better, exercise more and reduce screen time. I'm well aware of my need to practice what I preach. 

The Carrot 

Some people quit smoking because they realize how costly it is, how terrible it makes them feel and because of the damage they are doing to their bodies. Others quit smoking because they want to breathe easier, feel good and live longer. Two sides of the same coin, but for whatever reason, some are motivated more by one than the other.

We have already mentioned the stick in the opening paragraph of this post, highlighting again the dangers of sitting. What about the carrot? Aside from the obvious and previously linked health benefits, why would one want to take a walk?

One of my favorite websites is The Art of Manliness. Their recent post entitled "Solvitur Ambulando: It Is Solved By Walking" is a great read on the various ways that walking can be emotionally beneficial. Some occasions that call for a walk, from their post: 

  1. When you're spiritually dry
  2. When you want to really get to know a place
  3. When you're lacking inspiration
  4. When you're stressed, depressed or anxious
  5. When you need to work through a problem with a friend or lover

There are many other examples with full explanations, but these are some of my favorites. 

We speak often of the ministry of presence as a vital form of health ministry. National Public Radio (NPR) recently featured a story about how taking a walk in the woods can help cultivate the ability to be present by practicing the art of 'noticing' while walking. From the story:

Refining our capacity to notice is an act of reverence that we can bring to everywhere and everywhen. It's an invitation, bringing the world's most basic presence into view, opening our horizons and restoring our spirits.

Ready to build a habit of walking? Check out these tips for making the habit stick from successful exercisers!

More Walking in the News:

Photo Credit: HarrietHorne

Be Careful When Walking!
 

Jun
27
2013
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/today-is-national-hiv-testing-day">Today is National HIV Testing Day</a></h1>

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes AIDS. Today, in honor of National HIV Testing Day, National Episcopal AIDS Coalition (NEAC) and National Episcopal Health Ministries encourage you to get tested for HIV.

The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested. Many people with HIV don’t have any symptoms. In the United States, 1 in 5 people living with HIV don't know they have it.

Even if you don’t feel sick, getting early treatment for HIV is important: early treatment can help you live a longer, healthier life.

Am I at risk for HIV?

HIV is spread through some of the body’s fluids, like blood, semen (cum), vaginal fluids, and breast milk. HIV is passed from one person to another by:

  • Having unprotected sex (vaginal, anal, or oral) with a person who has HIV
  • Sharing needles with someone who has HIV
  • Breastfeeding, pregnancy, or childbirth if the mother has HIV
  • Getting a blood transfusion that has HIV (very rare in the U.S.)
  • HIV testing is covered for many people under the Affordable Care Act, the health care reform law passed in 2010. Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get tested at no cost to you. Talk to your insurance provider.

For more information (including local events), visit the CDC website for National HIV Testing Day.

tags AIDS