Sep
02
2014
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/share-your-story-with-recovery-ministries">Share your story with Recovery Ministries</a></h1>

Our friends at Recovery Ministries of The Episcopal Church have relaunched their blog. They invite you to share your experiences of addiction and recovery also. See below for guidelines for submitting your story!


Below is a link to Recovery Ministries' easy signup sheet on Sign-Up Genius. Simply click on the link, pick a date you want to sign up for by filling in your name and email, write your post and submit it to info@episcopalrecovery.org for review and posting a week before the deadline.

It can be anything, from how you use a gratitude list to how you relate the week’s Gospel lesson to the 3rd step to your personal story of resurrection. Below are the details for your reference and to get your creative energy flowing. Once you sign up for a slot, you will receive an automated reminder about 2 weeks prior to the publish date.

To sign up, click here: Sign Up Genius Link


The fine print:

  • Posts should be roughly 350 – 800 words and should be about your personal experience with recovery in some way.
  • Be nice. It’s ok to voice an opinion, complaint, or discuss a controversial topic, but remember we strive to be solutions based people.
  • Obscenities, personal attacks, threatening, harassing or abusive content, and defamatory comments about any person, group, organization, or belief will not be published.
  • Remember anonymity when discussing 12 step fellowships. It’s ok to mention a specific fellowship by name, but if you do so, we will post the submission anonymously.
  • By submitting, you declare that you are the sole owner and author of the article and own 100% of all copyrights pertaining to it.
  • The post should not include marketing-related links and should not be self-promotional.
  • Your submission to the blog gives permission for us to publish your article on the website, social media site, and distribute to our membership and to our email list.
  • There are no guarantees made that article(s) will be published. We reserve the right to remove article(s) at any time for any reason. We also will remove any blog post written by you, at your request.
Aug
29
2014
by Sue Hacker Nelson   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/friday-roundup-82914">Friday Roundup</a></h1>

Each week, we highlight stories from our newsfeed on Prismatic. No account is required to see what we think is worth reading, so visit our profile often! We update it daily so there is usually something new to check out. Here is a sample of what we liked this week:

Ancient Mayan cities uncovered in Mexican jungle from CBC News
Archaeologists have found two ancient Mayan cities hidden in the jungle of southeastern Mexico, and the lead researcher says he believes there are "dozens" more to be found in the region.

Happy 98th Birthday to the National Park Service from Whitehouse.gov
From our spacious skies and fruited plains to our purple mountain majesties, the United States boasts some of the world's most breathtaking natural lands. On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson created the National Park Service to formally protect and preserve these lands so people all over the world could experience America's historic beauty and heritage for years to come.

More Schools Consider Later Start Times For Teenagers from the Wall Street Journal
At the pediatric sleep disorder center at Seattle Children's Hospital, Maida Chen sees many teenage patients with a common problem. "Easily 90% of them, part of their problem is insufficient sleep," said Dr. Chen, director of the center and also an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. "It's not that they have a sleeping problem but it's that they're not sleeping enough."

Churches must provide a space where people are free to be themselves from Religion News Service
On Sundays, churchgoers gather inside congregations that are remarkably monochromatic. Whites with whites, blacks with blacks, Latinos with Latinos, Koreans with Koreans, and so on. This phenomenon, however, is more than discomfort with diversity. It is also a search for safety. In the historic black church, for example, worshippers can assert the dignity and worth that a white society denies them. For three hours on Sunday, the need to avoid offending whites doesn’t govern their lives.

Let us know which articles you liked (or didn't) in the comments!


                    

Aug
22
2014
by Sue Hacker Nelson   |   comments

Each week, we highlight stories from our newsfeed on Prismatic. No account is required to see what we think is worth reading, so visit our profile often! We update it daily so there is usually something new to check out. Here is a sample of what we liked this week:

The Episcopal Church welcomes you ... to use the bathroom from Episcopal Cafe
Does your church offer a bathroom ministry? You may have never thought of it as such, but in New York City, this is a much appreciated outreach at Trinity Wall Street and St. Paul's Chapel.

Why Hungry Seniors Aren't Getting Enough To Eat from NPR
When we picture hungry Americans, we may see the faces of children, or single moms. But many of the people who struggle to fill their bellies are beyond age 65. Some of them are even malnourished, a condition that sets them up for all kinds of other health risks, like falling. Malnutrition may go undetected — by the general public and by doctors — until the seniors show up in the emergency room, often for an injury or other reason.

It’s going to take a lot more ice buckets to fill the NIH funding gap from The Washington Post
In the weeks since Facebook has been filled with ice bucket challenge videos, there's been a robust public debate over what it means that people are suddenly donating to ALS research at record rates. But this latest viral sensation is also highlighting how much philanthropy is having to step in to make up for the declining public investment in research to cure some terrible diseases.

Let us know which articles you liked (or didn't) in the comments!


                    

Aug
21
2014
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/join-us-for-a-free-course-in-understanding-violence">Join us for a free course in Understanding Violence!</a></h1>

Sue Nelson and I are taking this free course from Coursera entitled 'Understanding Violence' beginning September 3. The course is offered by Emory University. To be clear, Episcopal Health Ministries is not sponsoring this course. However, we do expect it to be very worthwhile and invite you to join us as participants!


Register for the free course here!

Violence is a leading cause of death, disability and health care use in the United States as well as worldwide. Although significant progress has been made in the last few decades, there remains a great need to further reduce the frequency of violence and its long term effects.  Violence causes approximately 50,000 deaths each year and over 2.5 million injuries in the U.S. each year, with an estimated annual cost of $70 billion. Furthermore, violence does not occur in a vacuum; the consequences are also felt through other medical conditions and health behaviors and individuals, families, and communities affected by violence are often irreparably altered.

Violence is a complex problem and can only be understood and reduced though a multidisciplinary approach.  The course will cover the epidemiology of violence; roots of violence including biological, psychological, and social causes (e.g., economic deprivation, religious factors); specific types of violence; media and the arts portrayal of violence; the business/economic impact of violence; physical and mental consequence; and ways to control and prevent violence in our communities, including criminal justice and public health approaches.  Through these perspectives, the course will deepen our understanding of violence in local, national, and global contexts. 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the problem of violence in the U.S. and globally, as well as the long-term effects.
  2. Analyze the causes of and associations with violence from a multidisciplinary perspective.
  3. Explore different solutions and programs for the prevention of violence.
Aug
15
2014
by Sue Hacker Nelson   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/friday-roundup-081514">Friday Roundup</a></h1>

Each week, we highlight stories from our newsfeed on Prismatic. No account is required to see what we think is worth reading, so visit our profile often! We update it daily so there is usually something new to check out. Here is a sample of what we liked this week:

Elephant Mosaic In 5th Century Synagogue Uncovered from HuffPost
There are many amazing characters and creatures described in the Hebrew Bible, but elephants are not among them. Imagine the surprise of a team of archaeologists who were in the midst of their fourth summer of excavations at an ancient synagogue in Israel’s Lower Galilee when they discovered elephants in a mosaic panel where they expected only to find biblical scenes.

13-year-old girl destroys batters to send her team to Little League World Series from For the Win
Mo’Ne Davis tossed a shutout in Philadelphia’s 8-0 win over Delaware, sending her team, the Taney Dragons, to the Little League World Series. The 13-year-old struck out six batters and allowed only three hits and three walks in her incredible performance.

A Prayer for Those Suffering from Depression from Spirituality & Practice
An estimated 21 million Americans experience some form of depression every year. It is an emotionally, physically, and spiritually depleting disease that can lead to suicide. Robin WilliamsWe are still reeling from the news of the suicide of Robin Williams who valiantly struggled with depression for many years.

Let us know which articles you liked (or didn't) in the comments!