Oct
31
2014
by Sue Hacker Nelson   |   comments

Each week, we highlight stories from our newsfeed on Prismatic. No account is required to see what we think is worth reading, so visit our profile often! We update it daily so there is usually something new to check out. Here is a sample of what we liked this week:

Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar from NPR
Sugar skulls, tamales and spirits (the alcoholic kind) — these are things you might find on ofrendas, or altars, built this time of year to entice those who've passed to the other side back for a visit. These altars in homes and around tombstones are for Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, a tradition on Nov. 1 and 2originating in central Mexico.

Brush Up On These 10 Important Skills Many Young Adults Are Losing from Lifehack
In today’s world, we constantly rely on tools, electronics, and connected devices. Growing up in a world of ever-increasing connectivity is bound to require different skills than were needed before. Being a millennial myself, I feel many criticisms from older generations relating to this are misplaced. On the other hand, young people do stand to lose some important skills if we let new technologies completely obscure our approach to life. We might not need to know how to repair things like fences or old-time appliances, but the DIY mentality could be powerful if applied to our new devices.

The World Of Vodou: Exhibit Brings To Life A Highly-Misunderstood Religion from The Huffington Post
The real world of Haitian Vodou is hardly like what Hollywood would have us believe. For one, many depictions of the religion focus on New Orleans-based Voodoo, a related but separate set of traditions. To help understand this tradition, Chicago's Field Museum is taking a deep dive into the world of Vodou in a new exhibit running October 24, 2014 - April 26, 2015.

Nine in Ten Uninsured Unaware that the Affordable Care Act’s Second Open Enrollment Period Starts in November from KFF.org
With the second annual open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act set to begin Nov. 15, the latest Kaiser Family Foundation tracking poll finds major gaps in the awareness of the nation’s uninsured residents who are a primary target for enrollment and outreach efforts. The survey finds nine in ten (89%) of the uninsured are unaware that open enrollment begins in November — including, 76 percent who say they do not know when open enrollment begins and another 13 percent who name a start date other than November 2014.

Let us know which articles you liked (or didn't) in the comments!


                    

Oct
30
2014
by Matthew Ellis   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/affordable-care-act-open-enrollment-starts-november-15">Affordable Care Act Open Enrollment starts November 15!</a></h1>

The Open Enrollment period for 2015 coverage is November 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015.

If you haven’t enrolled in coverage by then, you generally can’t buy Marketplace health coverage for 2015 until the next Open Enrollment period for coverage the following year.

If you’re enrolled in a 2014 Marketplace plan, your benefit year ends December 31, 2014. To continue health coverage in 2015, you can renew your current health plan or choose a new health plan through the Marketplace during the 2015 Open Enrollment period.

If you don’t have health coverage during 2015, you may have to pay a fee. The fee in 2015 is higher than it was in 2014 — 2% of your income or $325 per adult/$162.50 per child, whichever is more.

Enrollment and coverage start dates

During Open Enrollment, if you enroll:

  • Between the 1st and 15th days of the month, your coverage starts the first day of the next month.

  • Between the 16th and the last day of the month, your coverage starts the first day of the second following month. So if you enroll on January 16, your coverage starts on March 1.

For more information, visit HealthCare.gov!

Oct
21
2014
by Sue Hacker Nelson   |   comments

Ebola.

This one word is causing all kinds of consternation across the United States as people are trying to sort fact from rumor while having all of their fears fanned by incessant media coverage.

For example, there’s the teacher in Maine who got put on administrative leave because parents were concerned that she had traveled to Dallas.

Actually she’s not the only one – there’s also a teacher in Alabama who was on the same plane (but different day) from one of the Ebola patients who is now on administrative leave. 

Finally, there’s this article from the New York Times includes comments from a family in Louisville, Kentucky who are mostly staying in their home in order to avoid Ebola.  

While I am all for prudence in the face of what is a terrible disease, I do think we’ve gone a bit too far.

On Friday I flew from Phoenix to Chicago on Frontier Airlines.  Yes, the same airline that the nurse who got ill had flown.  There was a couple on my flight wearing surgical masks - I can only assume it was as a precaution against Ebola.  I do hope it made them feel more comfortable but I felt at no higher risk without one.

I certainly recommend being prudent. Unless there is actually an Ebola outbreak in your area, simply take the same types of precautions you would in the midst of flu season – wash your hands often, avoid touching your face, and practice other good health habits.

Once we understand that it is hugely unlikely Ebola is present in Maine, Alabama, Kentucky, Indiana – or wherever you live – we can focus our efforts on illnesses that are actually killing people in our communities.  If the media would spend a fraction the effort they're spending on Ebola focusing on heart disease, the flu, traffic fatalities and other significant killers we could save more lives!

Oct
17
2014
by Sue Hacker Nelson   |   comments
<h1><a href="/blog/friday-roundup-101714">Friday Roundup</a></h1>

Each week, we highlight stories from our newsfeed on Prismatic. No account is required to see what we think is worth reading, so visit our profile often! We update it daily so there is usually something new to check out. Here is a sample of what we liked this week:

Ministry serves farmworkers through sacraments, outreach from Episcopal News Service
On a rainy, humid mid-September morning five hours before the Sunday noon Eucharist at Sacred Family, the Rev. Tony Rojas got behind the wheel of a white van and began making the rounds to pick up men from the farmworker camps set back on highways and county roads among the single- and double-wide trailers and more stately brick homes of rural North Carolina.

Dear World: Let’s Stop Giving Our Crap to the Poor from we are that family
I was getting ready to leave for a trip to Kenya a couple of years ago, when a church emailed and asked if Mercy House had any specific needs. I quickly responded and told them I wanted to give Maureen, our Kenyan Director, an iPhone, so we could communicate during (almost weekly) power outages. I told them if they would buy one instead, we could use the money for other needed items.

Daniel Tiger: Won't You Be His Neighbor? from NPR ED
It's been 13 years since Mister Rogers' Neighborhood went off the air and more than a decade since the passing of its host. But the world Fred Rogers created for preschool children — one that's safe, nurturing and accepting — lives on in a PBS program called Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood.

Votes are in: 2014 Episcopal Church Christmas card contest winner from Episcopal News Service
Joan Covell’s depiction of the nativity scene was the top vote-getter in the 2014 Episcopal Church Christmas card contest.

Let us know which articles you liked (or didn't) in the comments!


                    

Oct
10
2014
by Sue Hacker Nelson   |   comments

Each week, we highlight stories from our newsfeed on Prismatic. No account is required to see what we think is worth reading, so visit our profile often! We update it daily so there is usually something new to check out. Here is a sample of what we liked this week:

Some People Are Born Java Junkies, Study Suggests from WebMD
Folks who chug lots of coffee may have their genetics to thank for their java cravings, a new study says. Researchers have linked six genes to a person's coffee consumption. All of the genes are related to the body's response to caffeine, according to the study.

Son of a Wife Beater: Behind the Curtains of Domestic Violence from The Huffington Post
October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and recent news of domestic violence charges against NFL stars Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson has touched me on a personal level. Although I've never met them, their stories of abuse are all too familiar. It resembles what I'd witnessed as a kid in my own family.

The rich got richer while the poor gave more to charity from The Episcopal Cafe
Danielle Kurtzleben of Vox writes: [D]uring the downturn and recovery, the poorest Americans upped their charitable giving. Meanwhile, the highest-income people gave less and less, the Chronicle of Philanthropy reported this week.

Let us know which articles you liked (or didn't) in the comments!